Posts tagged with "community project"

Community Fundraisers for the WE CARE Radiothon

Fundraising for the Yarmouth Hospital Foundation’s WE Care Radiothon starts long before we hit the airwaves on Feb 29th.

One of the most ‘talked about’ events for the Yarmouth Hospital Foundation is just around the corner … the WE CARE Radiothon!  2024 is a leap year and on Thursday, February 29th, we, along with presenting sponsor Y95, invite you to take a leap forward with us in support of your regional hospital once again.

The entire Tri-County community of Yarmouth, Digby & Shelburne will benefit from the new cardia rehab program coming to your regional hospital, so we are calling on the entire Tri-County community to support this important fundraiser!

Community fundraisers in support of WE CARE Radiothon:

Bruce Group Yarmouth: Honda, Chrysler & Kia are offering a donation to the Yarmouth Hospital Foundation for every test drive and vehicle sold during the month of February.

Next time you are in Wilson’s Home Hardware in Barrington Passage or Carleton Country Outfitters in Carleton, drop your loose change into one of the WE CARE Radiothon red jugs.

Here’s some other ways you can be part of WE CARE Radiothon 2024:

  • Friendly competition is one of the best motivators out there! Challenge a co-worker to meet or beat your fundraising total or throw a company-wide collection challenge.
  • Give a donation instead of exchanging Valentine or birthday gifts.
  • Sell secret valentines or candy-grams.
  • Host a“trivia night” and ask friends to make a donation to attend.
  • Have a bake sale, a craft sale or a cake walk.
  • Save all of your loose change and donate it – Little Chevrolet has once again pledged to match all coin donations on Radiothon day up to $5,000!

Show us how much YOU CARE! It’s community support that will enable your regional hospital to provide the best health care possible to the residents of  Digby, Shelburne and Yarmouth counties.  Every bit helps!

Maple Grove students STOMP over to Yarmouth Hospital Foundation with a generous donation!

When Grade 8 students — now graduates — Leila Ben Mohamed and Chris Coggins arrived at the Yarmouth Hospital Foundation office at the Yarmouth Regional Hospital to present a cheque for $759.15, the Maple Grove students were excited to share how they came to raise the money and why they chose to donate to the foundation. They were part of STOMP, a pilot project aimed at helping students in grades 7 to 12 develop an understanding of the factors influencing tobacco use and vaping and the consequences.

STOMP stands for Students Together Moving to Prevent Tobacco Use, explained faculty adviser and Grade 7 teacher Max Taylor. The group consists of student council members, athletes and kids who have experienced vaping themselves. Vaping is pretty common among students especially in the bathrooms, Leila and Chris agree. Smoking not so much. Kids perceive that vaping is a healthier alternative to smoking and don’t appreciate the dangers, their teacher pointed out. It’s more accessible and “you’re not walking around smelling of it.”

“It’s a program where you’re helping the community, you’re helping kids and your friends be aware of vaping and it’s a powerful message,” said Chris.

Leila explained that they made presentations to each class, followed by making posters inspired by the STOMP message. Leila and another student, Faith Lewis, were interviewed about STOMP on Y95. They also had donation jars in each classroom, Chris added. “If you raised a certain amount of money, Mr. Taylor would get pied in the face.” He wasn’t the only teacher to volunteer to get up close and personal with a whipped cream pie. And there’s video — lots of video!

Chris said the program has had a good response and made at least one convert. A friend of his stopped after hearing their presentation.

“We chose the foundation to donate to because most people affected by smoking or vaping have to come to the hospital if they are having problems,” Leila said. “Everyone needs the hospital one time or another.”

“We love to see donations from student groups and schools,” said foundation managing director Mary Surette. “We really appreciate their generosity at a young age. A huge thank you to these extraordinary young people!”

Maple Grove is one of about a dozen test locations across Canada for STOMP, an initiative of Physical Health and Education Canada. The two-year pilot project was launched at Maple Grove for the 2022-23 school year.

Rolling out to the beach at Bayside

Sometimes, the impact of a project or a donation can be hard to see immediately and only makes itself known over time — especially in health care, where the impact of new equipment and services often takes time to become apparent. And then sometimes, the impact is easily spotted. Bay Side Home, one of last year’s YHF Commitment to Health Care Community Fund recipients, submitted a grant proposal for a project where the impact was as plain as the smiles on their service-users’ faces.

Bay Side Home in Barrington is a long-term care facility for sixty-two residents, providing care at its best by working to meet the needs of the whole person and helping maintain a quality of life. Many of their residents require mobility assistance or are dependent on a wheelchair and these needs can limit their access to community or outdoor spaces. They applied to and were awarded a YHF Commitment to Health Care Community Fund grant last year, and the delightful results are so plain to see in the photographs from their Facebook.

The purchase of the Hippocampe all-terrain chairs allows their residents to access the beautiful area in which they live, and to visit places they once were able to go prior to residing at Bay Side Home. It enables visits to the beaches and seaside trails alongside the Atlantic Ocean, allows for the opportunity to travel and participate in activities around the province and to other outdoor attractions. Along with the physical benefits of time spent in nature, it supports mental health and well-being. Bayside’s Recreation Manager, Megan Lemoine noted, “Being outdoors attributes to better moods, decrease the chance of depression, reduced stress, provide opportunities for socialization and improve cognitive function.”

If you are a part of a registered charity or recognised non-profit in the Tri-County area, please take the time to look over our grant application today. Applications close 30 September, 2022.

National Volunteer Week graphic

Celebrating our volunteers

From April 24 to 30, 2022 Yarmouth Hospital Foundation and Volunteer Canada celebrate Canada’s 24 million volunteers during National Volunteer Week (NVW).

This annual celebration is a time to thank and recognize volunteers from coast to coast to coast. This year’s theme Volunteering is Empathy in Action highlights how this profoundly human connection is at the heart of healthier individuals and stronger communities.

Where would we be without our volunteers? Yarmouth Hospital Foundation is fundamentally rooted in the generosity and empathy of our all-volunteer Board of Directors and has been lucky enough to be supported by an army of volunteer partners-in-healthcare through all our events, past and present. Our donors and our volunteers are the heart and the hands of the Foundation, and this week, we just want to take a moment to express our gratitude for all of you and all that you do. Through your care and collaboration, we are building up our hospital to be a regional centre of excellence in health care.

Yarmouth Hospital Foundation boosts healthcare initiatives across the Tri-Counties

The Yarmouth Hospital Foundation has awarded grants totaling $150,000 to 11 organizations to aid in their mission to promote healthcare in the Tri-County area.

The grants are the first to be awarded by the Healthcare Enhancement Endowment (HEE) Committee, which was formed to develop eligibility criteria and oversee the Commitment to Healthcare Community Fund.

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Suicide intervention skills course answers community demand

Elisha Stairs can’t forget the day someone came into her office and announced that they planned to attempt suicide immediately after that meeting.

Stairs kept her cool and used her training to eventually help the young person to develop a safety plan for the rest of the day. She was just a phone call away for the rest of the day and at home in the evening.

The support worker/program coordinator at the Tri-County Women’s Centre credits the training she received in the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) offered as part of her Mental Health Recovery and Promotion course at Nova Scotia Community College Burridge Campus with allowing her to resolve this life-threatening situation safely.

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